RV’s offer you freedom like no other, however, it can also be overwhelming as there are so many different kinds of RV’s to choose from. You will likely hear terms such as teardrop trailers, class A/B/C, towable vs motorised, pop-up trailers and many, many more. So with all this choice, where do you even start? If you are trying to find the right RV for you then look no further as this post will explore the different RV types and classes. Whether you are hoping to buy your first RV or you are looking to upgrade/downsize, this guide will help you work out the best fit for you.

Class A

Class A motorised RVs are the biggest of the lot and they range between 21 to 45 feet and can weigh more than 20,000 pounds. Class A RVs are huge and some can sleep up to 10 people. There is no shortage of storage space, with plenty of bedrooms, a master bedroom suite and some even feature a ‘basement’ for even more storage. The kitchens in these RVs can rival that of a standard house and they scream luxury. The size of class A’s can be intimidating, especially if this will be your first time purchase. While these RVs are the height of luxury, driving and parking these types of vehicles can be quite difficult. Alongside their initial expensive cost, repairs for Class A vehicles also tend to be more expensive. If you are planning on spending a lot of time in your RV then you want it to be comfortable, however, if you are planning on using your RV occasionally then you might want to consider a different size.

Pros:

  • Extremely spacious living areas and bedrooms
  • Plenty of storage space
  • High-quality amenities
  • Ideal for long term living

Cons:

  • Expensive to buy, insure and repair
  • Expensive to fuel
  • Harder to drive on the road
  • Finding parking spaces can be difficult
  • Certain states require a specific license for bigger RVs

Class B

Class Bs are also referred to as campervans and van campers, and this is because they are smaller than class A and they look and drive like a van. If you want an RV for day trips and excursions then you should consider a Class B RV as these are much easier to drive and are still very comfortable. They offer more snug living quarters and generally include a queen-sized bed, a small kitchen and a bathroom (shower, sink and toilet). They tend to be most comfortable for two people, but you can often accommodate four, it will just be quite crowded. Class B is a lot more manoeuvrable on the road, so what you sacrifice for space, you make up for in ease of driving and parking. What’s more, they are also more affordable to maintain than class A RVs, so they make a perfect choice for spontaneous travellers and weekends away.

Pros:

  • More affordable to maintain, fuel and repair
  • Cheaper to insure
  • Perfect for day trips and weekends away
  • Ideal for couples
  • Easy to drive and park

Cons:

  • Can still be expensive to buy
  • Smaller living quarters
  • Less storage space available
  • Small/fewer amenities.

Class C

Class C RVs combine features from both Class As and Class Bs into a hybrid mid-size motorhome. They tend to range between 20 to 33 feet in size and so are smaller than the class As but still offer many of the same features, such as plenty of storage space and bigger sleeping areas. They are not as easy to drive as class Bs but they are still relatively agile and manoeuvrable on the roads. The initial price of a class C RV is typically less expensive than a class B but do not be fooled by that, as often Cs have higher fuel, insurance and maintenance costs than Bs do (but still not as high as class As). If you have a family and you don’t want to commit to a class A, then class Cs are the ideal option for you as they offer large living quarters, plenty of amenities and freedom to drive with ease.

Pros:

  • Large living and sleeping quarters
  • Plenty of storage
  • Full range of amenities
  • Less expensive to buy than Class As
  • Easier to drive and park compared to Class As

Cons:

  • Driving can be difficult for first time RV owners
  • Fuel, repair and maintaining class Cs can still be costly

Truck Campers:

If you are looking for something a lot smaller and cheaper than the class A, B and C options then you might want to consider a truck camper. These are campers that are placed in the back of a pick-up truck. They are quite small, but they are typically bigger than teardrop trailers and they accommodate two people comfortably. However, do not expect truck campers to come with any amenities such as a toilet, shower or stove. They are ideal for couples and travellers who plan on staying in places that offer your basic amenities.

Pros:

  • More affordable than other options
  • Easy to travel with
  • No excess costs

Cons:

  • No access to basic amenities
  • Small living/sleeping quarters

Travel Trailers:

Travel trailers are available in a variety of sizes from tiny teardrop trailers to 30 feet long models that accommodate up to eight people. Travel trailers are towed by another vehicle that has been rated to withstand its weight. You will be able to find a trailer for any family car usually, it will just take some time to research the relevant options.

Pros:

  • You can choose from all different sizes
  • Can be easily towed
  • An affordable option compared to motorized RVs

Cons:

  • You cannot drive in reverse
  • Restricted passenger space when travelling
  • Smaller trailers come with limited amenities

Hopefully, this post will have given you some clarity on the purposes of each differently sized RV. Purchasing an RV is a big investment, so make sure that you take the time to properly research each of the options and the different available providers. With a bit more time and research, you might find yourself the best vehicle for you at the best price available.